Animals, Activism, and Dialectics

Having worked with hides, bones, and other animal parts in my art and spirituality for 15+ years, I’ve had my fair share of people questioning me about what I do (or being even more high-volume in their responses and reactions). I understand it can be a pretty emotional subject for a lot of people; death is a difficult thing for a lot of people in this culture, and unnecessary death even moreso. But there’s this thing that the occasional dissenter does that drives me a bit batty. Somehow in their mind “you make things out of animal parts” turns into “you can’t possibly like animals because you eat/wear/make things out of dead ones!” It’s an accusation tossed out at other people, like hunters, taxidermists, omnivores, and so forth. And it’s completely based in a logical fallacy, with such varied names as “excluded middle”, “either/or fallacy”, “false dilemma”, and so forth. (You can find out more about this little cognitive blip here.)

First, such a statement narrows the potential options down to two, based in the idea that “you’re either with me or against me in this argument”. There’s no gray area between “If you love animals you’ll do everything I do” and “If you don’t agree with me it means you don’t love animals”. Furthermore, it completely invalidates my actual feelings on the matter. I do love animals. I’ve had many pets through the years that I cared for dearly and took good care of. I admire the beauty and diversity of other beings, and I appreciate the lives of the animals whose remains I now work with in my art and spirituality. I have always put aside some of the money from my art and book sales to donate to nonprofits that support wildlife and their habitats, not because I want to keep having hides and bones to work with, but because I want there to keep being a great diversity of life independent of any subjective (and especially material) value humans may place on it. I know my own heart and why it carries what it does.

Speaking of my heart, let’s look a little more at that idea that I don’t care as much as they do about animals (or at all). First of all, there’s not an empirical tool for measuring “caring”, or “love”, or “attachment”. And second, the idea that omnivores, taxidermists and the like “don’t care about animals” is a complete falsehood (and something I touched on earlier this year.) I can give you plenty of examples of people who eat, wear, and even kill animals who also love animals, which invalidates that “you don’t REALLY love animals” argument. I grew up in a small town with a significant farming community. I didn’t grow up on a farm myself, but I went to school with a lot of kids who did. I grew up around people who named baby calves and pigs, took good care of them, spoiled them rotten, and then took them to the FFA show or the county fair or the livestock auction and sold them to someone who would slaughter the animals for meat. Or their family would do the killing themselves, and they’d eat the meat of the same animal they cared for all year. This wasn’t seen as a contradiction. It was just the way livestock farming is; you care for animals, and some of them you kill later so your family (or another family) has food to eat. Sure, some of those farm kids grew up to be vegetarian because they didn’t agree with what they were raised with. But others kept that life/death balance, and they’re not more or less right than the ones who changed their minds.

It’s the same with hunters. Some of the most passionate nature-lovers I know are hunters. It’s not, as some animal rights people like to say, “go out and admire nature’s beauty and then kill it”. Hunters in cultures around the world, indigenous and otherwise, honor the very same animals they kill. So do many farmers, and other people involved in killing animals for human consumption, food and otherwise. In fact, it’s a sentiment that I think needs to be more widespread in the more corporate, overgrown areas of agriculture where the animals are just seen as a commodity. Seeing them as beings deserving care and respect does not mean that they are not also a source of sustenance. I do feel that as a culture we could honor the animals we depend on much more than we do, and that this could lead to changes in how we raise and kill them, and treat their remains afterward. But this requires the ability to accept both the life and the death of the animal and our involvement in both.

And that’s where we run into what I see as a big deficiency in this culture–a lot of people have trouble with dialectics. They don’t seem capable or willing to hold two seemingly conflicting ideas in their mind at the same time; it has to be either/or for them. We really aren’t prepared for the gray areas. Look at our two-party-dominated political system, and look at how they tear into each other during campaign season. Look at how often religious beliefs are framed in us vs. them terms. Same thing with sex and gender, race, and other group affiliations. We have the chorus of “right vs. wrong” drilled into our heads from an early age, and no one really prepares us for the possibility that things may be more complicated than that. I think sometimes when there comes a depiction of gray areas, there are those who shun them, and those who latch onto them; look at the strong positive response to Miyazaki’s film, Princess Mononoke/Mononoke Hime. One of the reasons it’s so beloved by its fans is because it’s not a simple good buy/bad guy picture; here’s a wonderful short comic that illustrates something profound that Miyazaki said about good vs. evil. I think we need more of that here. We need more challenges to this black and white way of viewing a complicated, sometimes messy world.

How do we learn to be more comfortable with dialectics? By being willing to face the uncomfortable reality that there will always be someone who disagrees with us vehemently. By accepting that people will have different solutions to complicated problems, and that our way is not the right way for everyone. By knowing that what may seem like a contradiction to one person may make complete sense to someone else, and that they may put every bit as much consideration into their viewpoint as the first person has (or perhaps more!) By being willing to try and understand the other person’s perspective, and remembering that “understand” is not synonymous with “agree with”. And, finally, by not seeing a dialectic as an excuse to attack or try to force the other person to choose between two black and white ways of seeing the issue.

Finally, I invite you to question how you approach those you disagree with, to include on really difficult, emotionally laden subjects, because you may not be completely at odds. Consider that I may agree with you on Opinion A, B, and C, all the way, but I may disagree with you on X and Y, and feel that Q and K are better options for me. It doesn’t mean I don’t still agree with you on A, B, and C, and I may even join forces with you on those. For example, I’m not a supporter of banning hunting, but I am a supporter of humane treatment of animals killed for meat, to include the quickest and most humane death possible. I don’t agree with trophy hunting or killing just for the sake of killing, but I’m okay with preserving the beauty of an already dead (natural death or not) animal for education, for a museum, or even for artistic expression. If you and I both think that bees and other pollinators need to be protected, my aesthetic appreciation of taxidermy doesn’t change that. But you may need to accept that I have different relationships with the bees and the deer, that lots of people relate to different beings and situations in varying ways, and that this sort of complexity is normal in this world.

Being able to understand and accept this complexity and the conflicts it may bring is, as far as I’m concerned, a more productive way of dealing with disagreements than hurling logical fallacies and invalidation at someone else. Instead of saying “I can’t see how you could possibly see things that way (and I refuse to even try)!”, try saying “Can you explain why you see things that way?” If what they say doesn’t mesh with your own opinions and you accept that disagreement instead of trying to force them to your way of thinking, at least you haven’t wasted your time with a pointless argument no one’s going to win and everyone’s going to resent. And you may still be able to find common ground on another issue that you can then join forces to work on. I’d rather have people approach me with that attempt at cooperation than accusations and fallacies; it’s a better use of scarce time and resources.

(One final note: as with many things, just because I can articulate things I think need to be improved doesn’t mean I don’t make the very mistakes I cite. If anything, this issue is closer to my mind right now in part because I can see where I screw up in this regard, to include recently. These posts are at least as much a reminder for myself as an invitation to others.)

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12 thoughts on “Animals, Activism, and Dialectics

  1. Hi, Luna.

    Very, very nice! I was trying to figure out how to say the very same thing that you have so well-expressed in this essay. I have personally been put through this kind of “wringer”, myself – most of it from some “hippie-ish” groups, and from many in the “new age” groupings. This is especially becoming a more-common meme these days, because of the increasing influence and cacophony originating from many of the “animal-rights” organizations and pro-vegan organizations.

    You have done very to express the commonsense-side of this issue, as I have tried to explore further, the biological and physiological-nature side of this very same issue. We are a largely-omnivorous (tending closer towards carnivorous) species! Our very physiology and biochemistry make this unmistakably-clear. Our mouth tells the story on what is the chief part of our diet. WHAT is there to argue with??? Yet, most of the detractors want to use their titles, “degrees”, certifications, and other of the familiar “social-status” badges to try to “oooh-and-ahh” their way out of an intelligent debate on the facts.

    Mind you,

    Many of the established colleges and universities are being used to actively recruit political correctness “change agents” and “followers” of the new “social norms”, while many of the multi-billion dollar corporations and trust funds are driving those efforts. Our health-related issues of today, are exploding because of the QUALITY of our food, NOT because of we supposedly “eat too much meat”, or ANY meat at all! – Most of members of our species REQUIRE a certain amount of animal-products in our diet if we are to achieve a state of optimum health.

    Many of these “touchy-feely” ‘animal-rights’ orgs and most of their membership have these wild fantasies that Nature and all of Her/His children should be cuddly and oh, so lovable! They have very little of a grasp that Nature can, and often is, very harsh and can even be heart-breaking to those who have lost the concept of “survival”. Yes, Nature is beautiful, but is also, in some cases UGLY (purely by OUR subjectivisms). The Nature (just as God, to some) is “All of the above and then some”. That’s the big difference between a “Realist” (you and me, for example) and what they like to mistakenly-term an “optimist” (which is more like a version of a “Pollyanna”).

    “Some things must die, so that others may live another day.” – That is part of the Laws of Nature in THIS reality. Yet, so many just do not grasp that fact.

    Thank you, wonderfully, for such a great piece of writing!

    – Rev. Dragon’s Eye,
    Founder, Temple of The Ancient Dragons

    • It really is a complicated issue. I have absolutely no problem with people who choose to not use meat, or fur, or other animal products, and I admire people who are driven by compassion. I simply don’t like when a small minority of them try to tell me what I do or don’t feel.

  2. I read this post a few hours ago, and I really like it. Thanks for your perspective. I have always felt the same way. I’ve felt like wearing shark’s teeth was a sign of reverence for a shark.

  3. I think a real love of something is best revealed when it includes the true relationship of need…real things like hunger and regret at feeding at the cost of another life. So I think you hit this one out of the park.

  4. Very well written, Lupa. You made some fine points here, a few of which I brought up to a friend of mine when he refused to see eye to eye on me with an issue, and a few of which I used to get us to understand each other’s points.

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